Official Website of Author

Carol Lynn McKibben

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SALINAS: A History of Race and Resilience

in an Agricultural City

Stanford University Press, 2022

SALINAS: A History of Race and Resilience

in an Agricultural City

Stanford University Press, 2022

“This important and engaging study of Salinas tells a vital story of racial divides—of how they have at times been exacerbated, but also often crossed, and at times even dissolved. This is a major contribution to California history, the history of race relations, urban history, agricultural history, and oral history. What is more, this book is instructive for the state and the nation.”

—David Wrobel, author of America’s West: A History, 1890-1950

OTHER PUBLICATIONS

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RACIAL BEACHHEAD

2011

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IMAGES OF AMERICA:SEASIDE

2009

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BEYOND CANNERY ROW

2006

DOWNLOAD A FULL CV HERE

 
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Official Website of Author

Carol Lynn McKibben

Urban History | Immigration | Race & Ethnicity | Gender 

Dr. Carol Lynn McKibben is an Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer. She has been teaching courses in California history, Urban history and Immigration history for the Department of History and Urban Studies at Stanford University since 2006. She has also engaged in numerous community based research projects on the Monterey Peninsula for thirty years.  

Her first book, Beyond Cannery Row: Sicilian Women, Immigration, and Community in Monterey, 1915-1999 placed women at the center of a transnational migration story that focused on the ways migration re-shaped Sicilian fishing families as they moved back and forth from villages in Sicily to Monterey, California and, at the same time, altered the character of the city over the course of the twentieth century.

Dr. McKibben served as Director of the Seaside History Project from 2005-2012. Her second book, Racial Beachhead: Diversity and Democracy in a Military Town (Stanford University Press, 2012) showed how federal investment and diversity of personnel stationed at nearby Fort Ord transformed a small community, Seaside, into an important center of civil rights activism in California.

As Director of The Salinas History Project Dr. McKibben is currently engaged in a community based research project that aims to re-examine the historical development of the city of Salinas in regional, state, and national context.

IN THE PRESS

A fascinatingly splendid book that challenges conventional wisdom about the power of race to shape urban life. This book illustrates the role of

small communities in the transformation of the twentieth-century American society.

Sardines migrate; fishermEn persist in following their paths—until, that is, women community builders declare an end to the constant shifting of home, family, and identity required by

this distinctive way of life. In her fascinating study of the fishing networks that linked Sicily, California, and Alaska, historian Carol McKibben makes a compelling case for female power. Her work reveals migration and settlement as deeply gendered processes in which female labor and decision making can be determinative. 

McKibben has written a provocative study whose implications extend well beyond the boundaries of its unassuming subject. She calls into question our conventional understanding of modern American urban history.

QUINTARD TAYLOR

UNIVERYSITY OF WASHINGTON

DONNA R. GABACCIA

COEDITOR OF ITALIAN WORKERS OF THE WORLD

MARK WILD

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY,

LOS ANGELES

 
 

UPCOMING EVENTS

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PAST EVENTS

 

CONTACT

For any inquiries, please contact

Tel: 831.596.9523 | E-mail: mckibben@stanford.edu

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© 2022 Carol Lynn McKibben